Refugee Health Services Available in Florida

Health services offered to refugees in Florida are immediately available to those in need. The health programs available to refugees will remain available for up to eight months, unless a refugee fails to have a medical exam within 90 days of arriving in Florida. Once a refugee has been living in the state of Florida for more than eight months, he or she is no longer eligible for refugee medical assistance and services, and will be expected to apply to Medicaid health insurance as a resident of Florida. For more information on refugee health services available in Florida, the following topics are available for review:

  • Health Assessments for Refugee Medical Assistance and Services in Florida
  • Types of Health Services Offered to Refugees in Florida
  • How Health Programs Available to Refugees in Florida Provide Assistance

Health Assessments for Refugee Medical Assistance and Services in Florida

For those wondering, "Are refugee medical assistance and services for healthcare available in Florida," the answer is, yes. Generally, before a refugee arrives in the United States, he or she will have already received a medical examination, but in the event he or she has not, a medical examination must be performed. Any refugee who does not have a medical examination will not be able to access refugee medical assistance and services, and may face being deported back to his or her own country.

Within 90 days of being in Florida, a refugee must have a health assessment done, which is paid for by the state's funding for health services offered to refugees, making it completely free. Health assessment sessions for health programs available to refugees are like general physicals. Within an assessment, vital signs and general recordings will be taken, including blood pressure, height, weight, BMI and sensory exams. Other, more in-depth medical tests are also run. For females, a pregnancy test will also be administered, depending on age. All tests will be conducted by Refugee Health Program professionals, and if some sort of medical condition is uncovered, all treatment will be provided. Refugees must also be up-to-date with all immunizations, which will be provided as well through the refugee health services available in Florida for those who need to be properly vaccinated. If refugees do not get their immunizations, health services offered to refugees in Florida may not be available moving forward.

Types of Health Services Offered to Refugees in Florida

There are four main refugee medical assistance and services offered: Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Time Limited Cash and Medical Assistance and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). It is important to note that The Time Limited Cash and Medical Assistance program can only be obtained if a refugee does not qualify for Medicaid or the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families programs. All of these health programs available to refugees are offered through local agencies and contractors. Download our free guide to review examples of agencies and contractors that provide refugee health services in Florida.

How Health Programs Available to Refugees in Florida Provide Assistance

As part of the health programs available to refugees, Medicaid covers a vast majority of medical costs. Medicaid is what will cover refugee medical costs as soon as a refugee arrives in the United States. Medicaid will provide a vast coverage of medical procedures to families considered low-income and all refugees that have been in the United States for less than eight months. However, once a refugee has been in the United States for at least a year, he or she will be subject to regular Medicaid eligibility requirements and must apply for Medicaid, once again, as a resident of the state of Florida. Learn more about how to reapply for medical assistance as a refugee resident in Florida by downloading our guide.

Health services offered to refugees are also available through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in Florida. The aim of SNAP is to reduce the amount of domestic hunger. When refugees first arrive, oftentimes, they have no money and no job, making it difficult to provide for themselves and their families. SNAP works with all state agencies in order to provide nutrition assistance to those who need it and to educate about smarter nutritional choices.

In the event that a refugee does not qualify for Medicaid or TANF, he or she may be able to apply to the last refugee medical assistance and service plan: Time Limited Cash and Medical Assistance. The Time Limited Cash and Medical Assistance Program will provide up to 48 months of assistance to qualifying adults in order to promote family self-sufficiency.

Another program that assists refugees with getting on their feet is the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Program. The TANF program, designed to promote self-sufficiency, offers assistance to families with young children who need money in order to continue to raise their children. Other features of TANF are to reduce needy parents by placing a greater importance on being prepared for work and marriage, by lowering the amount of out-of-wedlock children and by encouraging families to stay together as a unit and to work out their problems.

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What Health Services Are Available in Florida?

Health services are available for a wide variety of Florida residents and the benefits range from low-cost to free health care. However, the claimants and families that are interested in these benefits typically need to submit applications and documents that prove their eligibility for program benefits. Learn about the various health programs available in the state of Florida and find out how to qualify for affordable health care or medical coverage that is free of charge by downloading our guide.


Who Can Receive Florida Health Benefits?

Health service programs in Florida have a variety of eligibility requirements. Some of the factors taken into consideration when evaluating an applicant's eligibility include age and household income. However, even if petitioners do not qualify for health care in one program, they are often eligible for the benefits of another.